Entering another Contest

So one of my friends suggested I enter this contest. It’s sponsered by the Guide to Literary Agents. All that’s required is entering your first 150-200 words. If you win an agent critiques your first ten pages and you get a subscription to Writer’s Digest.
If any of you write paranormal romance or urban fantasy, click the link and enter!

I’ll let you know how it goes.

On rejection

Okay, so here’s the thing….rejection sucks.

What’s that? You were expecting some big eloquent blog post about the trials and tribulations of rejection in the writer’s life? Yeah, sorry. Not going to happen. Mainly because despite the multitude of resources, blogs, writer’s handbooks, etc with all their differing takes on the subject, they all boil down to the fact that rejection sucks.

See, even though my idea was enough to get me a request for a partial from a prestigious agent and a full from an editor with Kensington books, one form rejection on a query makes me doubt everything. And why should it? I mean Kensington freaking books wants to read my manuscript people! This is huge. Over the moon outstanding even.

But until I actually have an agent, I will keep querying. I will keep putting myself out there and taking the risk. And I will keep getting rejected. Okay, maybe not. Maybe today’s lightning fast rejection (it came back in less than 12 hours) was a fluke. Maybe everyone else will read my query and think it sounds awesome and ask for multitudes of pages. Maybe.

And part of me knows that the rejections that come after pages are read, after a full has been requested and rejected will be so much harder. I mean, how can they not like this thing that I poured a year of my life into? How dare they tell me it’s not for them? Then I’ll look back over it and think “oh, my god. This is horrible. How could I write such crap?” And my friends will smack me on the back of the head and tell me to get over it, because I rock, my book rocks, and my main character can kick your ass on any given day of the week.

You see that little niggling thread of doubt that has woven its way through this post? That is why rejection sucks. Writers doubt themselves constantly. We agonize, we analyze. And no matter how many people tell you what you do is awesome, that one rejection from someone who probably skimmed your letter and said, no kick ass heroines for me today, will always make you wonder if you can do this.

I know I can, and I’m not going to quit trying even if every query and all the pages I have out right now come back saying ‘not for me.’ So I guess you got the long post you were after even if it’s not very eloquent. But it still all boils down to…Rejection sucks.

This writing thing

I write constantly. I mean you might think I’m looking up information in the computer at work or shopping for groceries, but really I’m writing. My brain is always processing information, storing it away to be used later. I don’t even get a break when I’m sleeping. I keep a database of book ideas to refer to later, I’d say roughly 75% of those came from dreams.

Yeah, I have odd dreams. I actually had a friend who told me once that it wasn’t what I wrote that bothered her, it was the fact it was in my head before I wrote it. What can I say. She had a point.
There are times actually when I have a new idea or a new character beating against my brain. I think about it constantly, all the time, no matter what. Even if I’m working on a different project at the time. I have found when this happens that I have to sit down and get the idea down.

That doesn’t mean I have to write the whole book, or even a whole story. I just have to get enough of it down that I don’t need to keep it in my brain any longer. Once I do that, the voices are subdued enough I can work on other things.

Before you comment on the voices thing, I should mention I’m not the only person I know that hears voices. Several of my writer friends do as well. Yes, there’s a whole group of us. Scary thought, huh?

The whole point of this post? I’m one of those people who can not not write. Yes that’s a double negative. Get over it. What I mean is that I am incapable of not writing. I’ve tried it, it doesn’t work. I’ve written in some form or another consistently since middle school. The only time I went for any prolonged period without writing was when I was pregnant and I think that’s because my brain was mush for about 7 months of that time. So this writing thing, isn’t a cute little hobby of mine. It isn’t something I picked up to fill my free time. I have no free time. It’s not even something I have a choice about doing. I have to write or I’ll go insane. Of that I have no doubt.

I did it.

So submission is off to the agent. To be honest I’m not expecting a lot. Would I like to hear that she loves it and wants to represent it? Heck ya! She’s an awesome agent.

But, I haven’t even sent one query on this one yet. Let me tell you, the odds are not with me.

That being said, I love this book. I love the characters and the world. Without sounding completely egotistical, I think it’s good. Hopefully she will too.

 

On pitching and scary agents and whatnot.

Originally published 8/14/10:
So this was an interesting weekend. My writer’s group was given the opportunity to meet with Deidre Knight. For those of you who don’t know who that is, let’s just say she’s a big deal in writing circles. She’s not only a well-established agent, she’s also a multi-published author. Not only could we meet her, we were given the opportunity to pitch our book to her.

Ever since I found out that she was coming, I’ve been wondering what kind of person she would be. What the experience would be like, that kind of thing. I mean she seemed nice enough on twitter but how mean can you really be in 140 characters? (Don’t answer that question, I know people can be plenty mean on there)

For those of you who are not familiar with the writing industry, an agent is the key to a successful writing career. Finishing the book is only the first step in an incredibly long process. Without going into all the detail, let me just say that getting an agent to read any portion of your book is a huge step forward. It’s a step that will hopefully lead to them choosing to represent you. Now you know why I said scary agents in the title. It is scary to think someone is going to read and judge something you’ve poured hours of time and your heart and soul into.

Deidre was actually very nice and extraordinarily easy to talk to. I did pitch Possession to her. And while I think my pitching skills need a ton of work, she requested that I send three chapters and a synopsis to her. 

Keep your fingers crossed for me that she likes it enough to read the rest of it. 

Fantasy, Paranormal and Romance Author